9 Weeks – The First Visit and Viability Ultrasound

 

Frog is now the size of a cherry.

 

What to Expect at the First Doctor Visit:

  • Bring with you: The first date of your last period and when you took your first positive test, a list of questions you have, a list of symptoms you’re experiencing, ID and insurance
  • The doctor will ask about your concerns.
  • The doctor will tell you about their concerns and ask questions. You may not like all of it. If the doctor is not professional and kind, feel free to look for a different one. This is too important not to have a doctor who is a pretty good fit.
  • The doctor will give you a preview of what’s to come in the next few steps.
  • Sometimes the doctor will schedule a viability ultrasound outside of the office (if they don’t have their own machine) or give you one in the office.
  • Sometimes the doctor will schedule bloodwork or other tests, but usually that’s further down the road.
  • Often, the doctor will give a vaginal exam if you haven’t had one in a while.
  • Usually you will give a urine sample every visit.

 

My appointment was delayed by the office twice due to emergencies at the hospital. When I finally got in to see her, she was very sweet and nice. After a few brief questions about my medical history, she very gently and lightheartedly brought up my age. She basically put my mind to rest by telling me that I’m in a growing dynamic and that it’s starting to become more of a norm. Several of her patients are now over 40 and delivered normal, healthy babies.

 

Ultrasound Machine

 

The ultrasound machine wasn’t working, but they were working on trying to get it to start. So, I told her my fear that I wasn’t really pregnant and maybe it was early menopause. I told her about the weekly tests. She laughed. She said “Now I need to prove to you that you’re pregnant” and offered to do a blood test if the machine didn’t work.

I just kept praying that the machine would start working. Right at the end of the visit, it thankfully did.

 

 

This early the only way to do a viability ultrasound is transvaginally, which is the one that uses a wand that is inserted. It feels a little awkward, but is less uncomfortable than most pelvic exams.

 

There was Frog, a tiny little thing, with a heartbeat of 180 beats per minute, very strong and very loud. Proof that indeed, I’m pregnant. And with this picture, it’s gotten very difficult to keep the secret.

 

009

There’s our little peanut.

My “This Week’s Symptoms”

Nearly everything has lessened.

  • Nausea on and off throughout the day, though heavier at night (usually controllable with a light snack)
  • Slight breast tenderness
  • Slight bloating
  • Fatigue
  • Cravings for Mac and Cheese and Baked Potatoes because they are still one of the few things that don’t upset my stomach

 

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One Comment

  1. All doctors should do one at 6-8 weeks, to date the pregnancy and give you a due date. Then some will do another at 12 weeks, if insurance covers it. My first baby, I had an ultrasound at 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks. This time, only at 8 and 20 (different insurance).

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