11 Weeks – Products and Techniques that Relieve Nausea

This week, Frog is about the size of a fig.

Anti-Nausea Products – Do They Work?

 

Anti Nausea “Sea” Bands (Hard Sided)

These work on pressure points to alleviate nausea. People also use them for boating or other instances where you might experience motion sickness. These bands are put on  like a wristwatch with little holes that allow you to adjust fit.

Cost: About $14

Pros:

  • Help Level: Medium
  • The nausea did not disappear, but was eased enough to be able to function.
  • Colorful bands are cheerful.
  • Waterproof
  • Well made and durable. They are a heavy rubbery plastic. They do not stretch.
  • They come with good instructions.
  • Because the material they are made of is firm, you can adjust the tightness of the band (and the pressure) to your liking.
  • Easy to find. Available at Amazon, Target, Babies R Us, etc.

Cons:

  • The whole concept of this method is a hard plastic dot pressing against your wrist. It gets sore after a while
  • The rubber-ish band will start to chafe after a bit
  • The cheerful colors also draw a lot of attention. While they are available in more discreet colors, they still look like hospital bands.

 

Anti Nausea “Sea” Bands (Soft Sided)

Cost: About $5 – $10

These work just like the others, except they have a different band. These have a soft stretchy band that you slide your hand through.

Pros:

  • Help Level: Medium
  • The nausea did not disappear, but was eased enough I was able to function.
  • Bands are discreet appearing
  • The band is stretchy. I found these much more comfortable than the hard-sided ones.
  • These are a little harder to find than the others, but are available at most drug stores, such as Walgreens and CVS.

Cons:

  • Instructions are usually mediocre in these. A search on the internet will help you get a good fit.
  • These are a terry cloth material and therefore not waterproof, so don’t wear them swimming or in the shower unless you want and itchy wet wrist until they dry.
  • The bead used to pressure the pulse point is going to get sore after a while.
  • Lack of color options. Most of them are just black or navy blue.
  • Not as adjustable as the others, so may get uncomfortable on a big wrist or not be sufficient pressure for a small wrist.
  • Because of the material it will probably wear out/stretch out sooner than the hard-sided.

Preggie Pops or Preggie Drops (by Three Lollies)

Cost: About $3 – $7

These come in a wide variety of flavors, some of them are a little bizarre. Current flavors include sour tangerine, sour lemon, ginger, green apple, peppermint, sour raspberry, lavender, and spearmint. The “drops” version usually only includes an assortment of the fruit flavors.

The same company also makes “Queasy Drops” or “Queasy Pops” that come in a few more flavors, including papaya, orange, cola, and cinnamon. There are probably more flavors on the horizon.

Pros:

  • Help Level: High
  • Nausea is relieved almost instantly
  • The band is stretchy. I found these much more comfortable than the hard-sided ones.
  • These are a little harder to find than the others, but are available at most drug stores, such as Walgreens and CVS.

Cons:

  • Only lasts as long as you have the drop or pop in your mouth, or shortly thereafter.
  • Most packages are a variety pack and you probably won’t like all the flavors.
  • $3 for 5 lollipops is pricey
  • Your tongue or cheek may experience a burning/numbing sensation, like from the citric acid, if you use them all day every day like I did.
  • You’ll get tired of eating them

Other Things to Try

  • Avoid “hard to digest” foods like red meat and raw vegetables
  • Breathe some fresh air
  • Breeze in your face, such as a fan
  • Focus on a fixed point (if you’re moving). For example, if you you are a passenger in a vehicle, watch the horizon.
  • A cold compress, usually on the back of your neck or on your forehead
  • Keeping your house just a little cooler
  • Sniff a lemon, exhaling and inhaling smoothly
  • Suck on ice or frozen fruit
  • Drink a very ice cold water
  • Drink gingerale
  • Drink herbal tea (pregnancy safe tea only of course!). Try it both hot and cold to see which works best.
  • Eat small meals throughout the day. You can see more food recommendations here.

Always consult your doctor if you’re having any unusual symptoms or if you are consuming something that may cause a pregnancy risk (some energy drinks, for example).

 

My “This Week’s Symptoms”

  • Nausea continues, but is manageable – I know I have to avoid meat and raw vegetables.
  • Breast tenderness is now barely noticeable. I’ve moved to a sports type bra, but I recommend going a size or two down to still get some support out of it.

 

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